Mission Statement

Our mission is to assist families who experience, or are threatened with domestic violence and to increase the community’s awareness of this pervasive problem.

Cultural Competence Mission Statement

We are committed to the achievement of racial, ethnic and cultural diversity within its workplace, which will in turn provide the delivery of culturally competent care to the clients we serve. We strive to create an environment of acceptance of individual differences as we understand that diversity among our workforce contributes to a unified and interdependent team that is aware and sensitive to the diverse values and needs of one another as well as our clientele. This understanding and acceptance allows the empowerment of individuals to develop in order that each of us and each of the clients we serve can develop to their fullest potential.

Why the name change?

When the SOS Shelter opened in 1979 it was simply a shelter for victims of domestic violence. Over the last 38 years, the organization has grown to be so much more. The addition of comprehensive advocacy services that serves people in the shelter as well as those not in shelter. Providing people with information, assisting them with legal and court related options, helping locate and use other community services, providing transportation, food, clothing, cell phones, offering therapeutic services with a licensed social worker on staff. These are a few of the examples of our growth. More importantly, we realized that what we are engaged in is really about the hope that we get to see every day. We saw the ways that people can rise up, claim and create their own lives. We started to think about acknowledging and honoring that in a broader way. Communicating that we are more than a shelter. And as we talked and worked, we moved toward the new identity of the organization: Rise. We believe that it reflects the process that people are engaged in. We think the new name and logo identifies that—while still acknowledging our history. For years the logo of the organization included a ‘roof’ over the lettering and we kept that piece to pay tribute to our history and the founders of the organization.

 

Administrative Staff

Nicole Barren - Executive Director
Thomas Richards - Assistant Executive Director
April Hopkins - Manager of Shelter Services

Board of Directors 

Barbara NewcombPresident - Retired, Lourdes Center for Mental Health
 Courtney Ignarri - Vice President - Binghamton University
Rene Coderre Secretary - Retired, Binghamton University
Tad Cline – Treasurer -National Pipe and Plastic Company
Ronald Bill - New York State Sheriff's Institute
Jane Blake - Retired, Chenango Forks School District
Susan Carman - UHS 
Debra Cohn - Tully Rinckey PLLC
Denise Edmister - WBNG TV
Christina Kunzman - Broome-Tioga BOCES
 Paul Magner - Retired, Alexian Brothers Ministry
Sadie Purdy - Mothers & Babies Perinatal Network
Sysay Sysenh - The Spa at Traditions
Craig Williams - Endicott Police Department
 
 

 

 

Residential Program

Advocacy Services

Counseling

What is domestic violence?

Domestic Violence is a pattern of coercive behavior. This pattern can include abuse of various sorts of one family member by another including:

Perpetrators of domestic violence have a goal to establish and maintain power and control over their partners and/or other family members.

This violence affects people in every racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic group and includes people of all ages who have lived together or who have had an intimate relationship.

Domestic violence often escalates in severity and frequency over time and can have serious health and psychological ramifications.

How can you learn more?

Representatives from Rise are available to speak to community organizations about domestic violence and our services.

For more information, call 6O7.748.7453.

For additional information: www.opdv.ny.gov/whatisdv